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Mexican Bishop Says HOMOPHOBES Are ‘Sick’ And ‘Heartless’
Bishop José Raúl Vera López of the Mexican Roman Catholic Diocese of Saltillo has advocated for LGBT people for some time. In an interview with El País, he went even a step further. 
When asked about homsexuality, Vera said we cannot ‘cancel a person’s richness’ because of their orientation. “That is sick, that is heartless, that is lacking common sense.”
Though conservative on social issues such as the legalization of drugs, prostitution, and abortion, Vera is resolute in his support for the LGBT community. 
The 69-year-old was sent to his current diocese in the arid Mexican state as a punishment. Home of the drug cartel Los Zetas, Vera has survived a record number of death threats and assassination attempts while working to help, immigrants, natives, prostitutes, young people, and victims pf the drug cartel.

Mexican Bishop Says HOMOPHOBES Are ‘Sick’ And ‘Heartless’

Bishop José Raúl Vera López of the Mexican Roman Catholic Diocese of Saltillo has advocated for LGBT people for some time. In an interview with El País, he went even a step further. 

When asked about homsexuality, Vera said we cannot ‘cancel a person’s richness’ because of their orientation. That is sick, that is heartless, that is lacking common sense.”

Though conservative on social issues such as the legalization of drugs, prostitution, and abortion, Vera is resolute in his support for the LGBT community. 

The 69-year-old was sent to his current diocese in the arid Mexican state as a punishment. Home of the drug cartel Los Zetas, Vera has survived a record number of death threats and assassination attempts while working to help, immigrants, natives, prostitutes, young people, and victims pf the drug cartel.

(Source: elpais.com)

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Anonymous said: Seriously so grateful I stumbled onto this blog. I've struggled with my sexuality for a such a long time and I wish I could have seen this blog earlier. God works through people and I do believe He is working through you! Have a blessed night.

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Anonymous said: can u give me the best advice you can? I want to come out but my school can kick you out if you show any signs of homosexuality or bisexuality, and my parents would never want to have to take me out of the school because it is a good school. they would be angry at me for that, especially since they are homophobic. I haven't told anybody about my being gay yet.

My best advice is not to come out yet given your circumstances. Wait until you’re independent of your family to come out. If you have any LGBT friends or allies, do come out to them so you have a support system until you’re on your own.

I’m sorry you have to stay in the closet. It’s not fair at all. But for now it’s probably best. Once you graduate you’ll have the liberty to make your own decisions and be who God has called you to be. Do well in school so you can get scholarships and attend the college of your choice without your parents forcing some conservative college on you and tormenting you for four more years. This way you can be out without fear of retaliation. There are scholarships for LGBT+ folks too, like the Point Foundation, so be sure to check that out as you near graduation.

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Anonymous said: Hi, so I am a struggling Pansexual Christian coming from a very religious family and I've been feeling very miserable about myself. I've been praying and praying to God to help me. I feel that if I come out, my family won't accept me. I didn't choose to be this way and I hope they will realize that. I believe everything In the bible. I am a born again Christian and I know that practicing homosexuality is wrong but I'm only human, how am I supposed to be happy if I can marry someone.

Contrary to what you’ve been told, sexual diversity is part of God’s creation. God made us all a little bit different in certain aspects, yet essentially the same. And to be pansexual is just as normal as to have red hair. You have nothing to feel miserable about or to be ashamed of. It’s the people who tell you you’re wrong for being yourself who should be ashamed.

Perhaps you should wait until you’re independent of your family to come out. Stick with us and we’ll continue to uplift you and help you strengthen your faith. Be well.

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Anonymous said: I've talked a lot with my science teacher, a friend of my mother's who is happily married to another woman and a devote Christian with a degree in Theology. She explained to me that in the original copies of the Bible (New Testament) written in Greek does not mention homosexuality as a sin. What do you know about this? Also, which passage of the Bible do people take as being anti-gay?

The psycho-social construct of sexual/romantic orientation and gender identity/expression were not theorized until the 19th century. The word ‘homosexual’ didn’t exist until that time either. In the Bible there are just a few obscure passages about pagan and idolatrous sex that are used as a justification for religious bigotry. They’re discussed in our Clobber Passages page.

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iknowwhoholdstomorrow:

any other queer Christians feel awkward about the term ‘pride’ or is it just me? i’m not against queer rights or anything - it’s just the name, specifically. like, i’m grateful for many things, but i’m not *proud* because everything i have is a gift from God, not something that i achieved. i don’t feel *proud* of God’s love - I feel thankful for it, moved by it, deeply reciprocal in regards to it, but not *proud* :/

Ellis, LGBT pride is about self-worth. Despite people telling us otherwise, we rise above adversity and realize that we are worthy of respect, worthy of love, even the love of God. 

Our pride isn’t necessarily in our identity but in our resilience and our unity as people overcoming the same struggle.

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I feel like every homophobic person needs to watch this and put themselves in Ashley’s place.

Very powerful!

Gay Christian International
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brokenveil said: I've been wondering. What are the actual differences between Christian denominations? Is there a source or article I could read about it? Cause I feel like I'm rather ignorant on the matter and I believe that information will benefit me in the future.

Wow, this is a great question!

Some denominations have very subtle differences in beliefs while the way they worship is largely the same. Others have differences in worship. Some may like liturgical worship with traditional hymns and a pipe organ while some like praise bands with guitars, drums, and a keyboard.

For some, the sermon or homily is the main part of the service and they do not conduct Holy Communion (also called, Mass, The Eucharist, and other names) every Sunday while others view it as the main act of Christian worship to be performed each Sunday. In other cases, denominations break away to from their own denomination or are created because of issues of the time. We see this today in the struggle for equality for LGBT people and the ordination of women.

How should we approach this issue? I’m Episcopalian, but I attended Moravian College & Seminary and turn to the Moravian Church for many unique theological answers. The Moravian Church was the first Protestant denomination. Part of their belief of Unintrusiveness is that God positively wills the existence of a variety of churches to cater for different spiritual needs. There is no need to win converts from other churches. The source of Christian unity is not legal form but everyone’s heart-relationship with the Jesus Christ.

In addition, we are united in the core Christian beliefs found in the Nicene and Apostle’s Creeds, statements of belief formed by early church Patriarchs (and Matriarchs). These are the essential beliefs of Christian faith, so your church should at least uphold the creeds. Your denomination should welcome gender, sexual, and romantic minorities (and everyone for that matter!) without condition to ALL sacraments and areas of ministry and participation as Christ himself would. Some queer Christians, however, remain with denominations that aren’t quite there yet on inclusion, but they should be working toward full inclusion within their denomination. Visit the Find Your Community page to find a welcoming and affirming church. Any clergyperson in a particular denomination can tell you more about that denomination’s distinctions.

—Enrique

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"Having coffee with or spending time with a gay person, a transgender person, or anyone else who is different from you in any way does much more in those moments than debating scriptures or ideologies would ever do in a lifetime."

Enrique Molina, GCI Editor-in-Chief

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firepenguindiscodom answered your post: Good day everyone. I have a question: …

Discussions and/or helpful tips for people who are coming back to their faith after a very long absence would be nice. :)

I got you, will write something on the topic soon! —Enrique