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Anonymous said: How do you view the relationships between Naomi and Ruth or Johnathan and David?

Queer as a $3 bill. When the YouTube channel is launched, I’ll totes talk about it in detail. Everyone check out our ‘Donate’ page and help make YouTube happen!

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Anonymous said: Today when I was at church, I was in a small group and the guest speaker came over and said, "I have a question, why do Christian tend to be oppressors when it comes to homosexuals?" And there was this girl next to me who yelle out, "FINALLY!" And as the closeted gay I am, I looked over at her and I nodded my head in agreement. My youth leader started answering the question very kindly and I was like, YES in my mind, but then, he began speaking of how it was a sin, and me anf the girl were angry

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Today in my church, the gospel reading began with Jesus teaching that it’s not what goes in your mouth that defiles you but what comes out of it. You can couch your hatred in as much language as you want but it’s still hate. As it becomes less accepted to trash LGBT people, many have begun to soften their tone. “We don’t hate gay people, BUT…” And as soon as you add a qualifier on there, you’ve put Jesus in a box. 

In our prayers of the people today, the message of inclusion that should be in all churches was so beautiful:

In the name of our compassionate God who cares for all people without difference or distinction…

that God will stir up a new awareness of the dignity of every human being so that we may work together for the good of all…

In thanksgiving for the diverse gifts God gives to us all, and the grace to rejoice in the lives of those who are “different…”

Orientations and gender diversity is a gift. God makes us all different because we can all learn and grow from being around people unlike ourselves. And so I’m really hoping that church leaders stop acting like modern-day Pharisees and start walking in love. Jesus didn’t go around saying “you’re wrong, and you’re wrong.” So why should any person have the audacity to be more judgmental than God incarnate? -EM

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god-save-the-gays said: Enrique, I figured I would give you an update. If you don't remember me, I was the editor prior to you. I am pleased to say that today, I officially gave my first sermon after spending a summer in a internship with an Episcopal Priest. I am on the road to ministry.

Yaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaas!

We’re so proud of you and wish you well in this journey. 

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This was our gospel hymn today at church. I wish “conservative” Christians would think about this hymn whilst singing it. -EM

This was our gospel hymn today at church. I wish “conservative” Christians would think about this hymn whilst singing it. -EM

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Anonymous said: I'm a currently Catholic, and I'm a gay male. So, as you can imagine, I don't feel welcome in my own church. I have considered converting to the Episcopal church, but I have a few questions. 1. I firmly believe in praying to the saints and to Mother Mary for intercession. I understand that the Episcopal church does not pray to the saints. Why not? Could I still pray to them? 2. How similar are the services at an Episcopal church?

letlovemeetlove:

Hello, anon! 

The Episcopal Church is a “big tent” denomination, where many different (and sometimes differing) beliefs coexist and indeed thrive together. While there are some Episcopalians who might be uncomfortable with a catholic understanding of the Communion of Saints, you will also find a great many who do look to the saints to for guidance and succor. The Episcopal Church is in very many ways both Catholic and Protestant—straddling the line between both traditions. There are more Protestant Episcopalians who are uncomfortable with the  ”Romish” doctrines of praying to the saints and Marian devotions in particular. That said, the Episcopal Church will never be Protestant enough to dismiss entirely the influence of the saints in our life. You’ll find a great many (most?) Episcopal churches named after the saints. We celebrate feast days and All Saints Day. Some of us even take the names of saints at our confirmations. While the saints do not play as prominently into the cultural life of the Episcopal Church, you’ll certainly not find them absent. 

As to your second question, the Mass looks very similar in both churches. there are some minor differences (for example, we pass the peace before the Eucharistic Prayer, Roman Catholics pass it immediately after the Lord’s Prayer.) The basic structure of the liturgy is exactly the same. Entrance Rites (including the Gloria and the Kyrie), Old Testament reading, Psalm, Epistle reading, Gospel, homily, Eucharistic Prayer, Communion, Blessing, Dismissal. We also sing hymns interspersed through the Mass. Just like Roman Catholics, our liturgical styles run the spectrum from formal to informal, solemn to loose. 

I hope that this was helpful for you! Making a visit to an Episcopal Church near you might be worthwhile. If you’re not sure where the nearest church is, you can use this link to find one! If you have any more questions, please let me know! 

We had a Catholic gay person ask for advice. Here is another voice. Even though I am Episcopalian, I font think I’m biased when I recommend The Episcopal Church. I’ve worked for them all and none is perfect. But the Episcopal Church understands more than most that there’s a wideness in God’s mercy. —Enrique

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Why can’t people see that another world—one without racism, sexism, homophobia, poverty, &c.—is possible?

letlovemeetlove:

This world is enough to break your heart sometimes. 

We must have hope that one day we can achieve a world without sexism, heterosexism, war, or poverty. A better world is possible if we all do our little part to walk in love.

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From the topic:Why does it seem in the world there is more gay male bashing and not as much lesbian bashing?
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wr1t3r43v3r said: Why does it seem in the world there is more gay male bashing and not as much lesbian bashing? Both are bad of course, but I feel everyone's attention is mainly on gay men.

That’s an excellent question. 

The reason gay men are targeted for gay bashing more often than gay women is because gay men are seen as abandoning their manhood. Men are raised to believe they have to prove and assert their masculinity, especially by being “in charge” of women. So gay men are seen as effeminate, weaker, and abandoning their masculine heritage. 

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Anonymous said: The Courage Apostalte/Courage International irks me a lot. The celibacy issues scares me a lot as an LGBT Catholic. It's like I'm being singled out. Like I'm still "loved" and "accepted", only to be screwed over, to live life alone while everyone else has the privilege of not worrying about the things I have to. It's not fair. It irritates me a lot. I could go on about every detail that irritates me, but I won't. What is your advice to the LGBT Catholic, especially the youth, dealing with this?

You can realize the hypocrisy behind this organization. They’re basically setting up a conditional prerequisite for being a Christian. Jesus didn’t say if I am lifted up, I’ll draw some and good luck to others. He said He’d draw all person unto himself: no exceptions, no prerequisites. Francis might be setting a softer tone, but the RC Church has a long way to go. And they’re not getting there anytime soon.

I was nominally Roman Catholic for quite some time and chose to become Episcopalian. It’s the advanced placement of Catholicism: same rituals but half the guilt, to quote the late Robin Williams (also Episcopalian). So if you’re on your own or you’re a Roman Catholic teen with an option as to which church you want to attend, I highly recommend The Episcopal/Anglican Church. Many are LGBT-affirming. Check our Find Your Community page to double check. Otherwise, you can recognize the Roman Catholic Church’s teachings on gender and sexuality for what they are: invasive, horribly controlling, and just plain wrong.